Friday, November 29, 2013

WHO: MERS-CoV Update – Nov 29th

 

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The news earlier this week that three camels which had had contact with two Qatari MERS-CoV patients had tested positive for the MERS coronavirus (see Dr. Mackay On MERS Cluster In Camels) has opened up a new, and possibly promising avenue of investigation – but there are still a great many unanswered questions regarding the role that camels may (or may not) play in the transmission of the virus.

 

Today the World Health Organization has posted a GAR update on these findings in camels, and reminds us:

These results demonstrate that camels can be infected with MERS-CoV but there is insufficient information to indicate the role camels and other animals may be playing in the possible transmission of the virus, including to and from humans.

 

Follow the link to read:

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) - update

Disease outbreak news

29 November 2013 - On 27 November, 2013, the National IHR Focal Point of Qatar notified WHO that the Supreme Council for Health and the Ministry of Environment, in collaboration with the National Institute of Public Health and Environment (RIVM) of the Ministry of Health and the Erasmus Medical Center in the Netherlands, have detected Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in a herd of camels in a barn linked to two confirmed human infections infections (see DONs dated 18/10/13 and 29/10/13).

Qatar investigation findings

Following the detection of two human cases infected with MERS-CoV, Qatar authorities (Public Health Department and the Department of Animal Resources) conducted a comprehensive epidemiological investigation into potential sources of exposure of human cases, with the support of an international team constituted by WHO and FAO.

Laboratory investigations at RIVM and Erasmus Medical Center have confirmed the presence of MERS-COV in 3 camels in a herd of 14 animals with which both human cases had contact. As a precautionary measure, the 14 camels on the farm have been isolated. All camels were asymptomatic or with mild symptoms when samples were taken and remained so during the following 40 days. All contacts of the two confirmed human cases, as well as the other worker employed in this barn, have been screened and laboratory tests were all negative for MERS-CoV.

These results demonstrate that camels can be infected with MERS-CoV but there is insufficient information to indicate the role camels and other animals may be playing in the possible transmission of the virus, including to and from humans. The Supreme Council of Health is working with the RIVM and the Erasmus Medical Center to test additional samples from other animal species and from the environment of the barn. In addition, the Public Health Department and the Department of Animal Resources are conducting further studies at the national level to investigate the infection risk among individuals in close contact with animals.

People at high risk of severe disease due to MERS-CoV should avoid close contact with animals when visiting farms or barn areas where the virus is known to be potentially circulating. For the general public, when visiting a farm or a barn, general hygiene measures, such as regular hand washing before and after touching animals, avoiding contact with sick animals, and following food hygiene practices, should be adhered to.

WHO is working with the Qatari authorities to further review these findings and to develop additional guidance as necessary.

Globally, from September 2012 to date, WHO has been informed of a total of 160 laboratory-confirmed cases of infection with MERS-CoV, including 68 deaths.

(Continue . . . )

 

1 comment:

Ned Hamson said...

Not enough camels carrying MERS-CoV in close association with people to cause this many cases. Get back to the bats - who may have passed to people and camels - because the one thing in common is a huge date harvest that draws insects, bats, date pickers, date packers, markets...