Thursday, December 10, 2015

CDC Updates Travel Notices On Zika In The Americas

http://www.cdc.gov/zika/index.html

#10,794


Given the rapidly evolving situation with the Zika virus (see ECDC Rapid Risk Assessment – Zika & Microcephaly) the DC has updated their travel notices on the Zika virus this afternoon to now include 9 countries in the Americas – a number that is expected to grow – with a warning to pregnant women in particular to take extra precautions to avoid mosquito bites.



  • New Zika Virus in Central America December 10, 2015 In November 2015, the first local transmission of Zika virus infection in Central America was reported in El Salvador. Local transmission means that mosquitoes in the area have been infected with Zika virus and are spreading it to people. Zika virus is now being reported in other countries in Central America.
What is the current situation?
In November 2015, the first local transmission of Zika virus infection in Central America was reported in El Salvador. Local transmission means that mosquitoes in the area have been infected with Zika virus and are spreading it to people. Zika virus is now being reported in other countries in Central America.
As of December 10, 2015, the following Central American countries have reported cases of Zika virus:
CDC recommends that travelers to Central America protect themselves from mosquito bites. The Ministry of Health of Brazil is concerned about a possible association between the Zika virus outbreak and increased numbers of babies born with birth defects. For this reason, pregnant women should take extra precautions to avoid mosquito bites.
(Continue . . . )
 
 


  • New Zika Virus in Mexico December 10, 2015 In November 2015, Mexico reported two locally transmitted cases of Zika virus infection. These are the first cases of Zika virus in Mexico. Local transmission means that mosquitoes in Mexico have been infected with Zika virus, causing it to spread to humans.
    What is the current situation?
    In November 2015, Mexico reported two locally transmitted cases of Zika virus infection. These are the first cases of Zika virus in Mexico. Local transmission means that mosquitoes in Mexico have been infected with Zika virus, causing it to spread to humans.
    CDC recommends that travelers to Mexico protect themselves from mosquito bites. The Ministry of Health of Brazil is concerned about a possible association between the Zika virus outbreak and increased numbers of babies born with birth defects. For this reason, pregnant women should take extra precautions to avoid mosquito bites.
    (Continue . . . )



  • New Zika Virus in South America December 10, 2015 In May 2015, the first local transmission of Zika virus infection in South America was reported in Brazil. Local transmission means that mosquitoes in the area have been infected with Zika virus and are spreading it to people. Zika virus is now being reported in other countries in South America.  
    What is the current situation?
    In May 2015, the first local transmission of Zika virus infection in South America was reported in Brazil. Local transmission means that mosquitoes in the area have been infected with Zika virus and are spreading it to people. Zika virus is now being reported in other countries in South America.
    As of December 10, 2015, the following South American countries have reported cases of Zika virus infection:
    CDC recommends that travelers to South America protect themselves from mosquito bites. The Ministry of Health of Brazil is concerned about a possible association between the Zika virus outbreak and increased numbers of babies born with birth defects. For this reason, pregnant women should take extra precautions to avoid mosquito bites.
    (Continue . . .)




  • NOTE:  Due to a problem with Blogger and my blogging software, you'll have to use the `OLDER POSTS' button below to access earlier posts from today.  My apologies for the inconvience. -  MPC

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