Thursday, April 02, 2015

APHIS: H5N2 Confirmed In South Dakota, 4th Farm Hit In Minnesota

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# 9895

 

We’ve two announcements today from the USDA’s  APHIS (Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service) regarding HPAI avian flu in the United States.  

 

First,  South Dakota has become the 13th state to report H5N2 – this time in a turkey farm in Beadle County.    Given the rapid spread across the Western states so far, we should not be surprised to see more states added to this list.


Second, Minnesota reports their 4th commercial turkey farm – this time in Nobles County – hit with the highly pathogenic H5n2 virus.  Of note, Nobles county is in the extreme south of the state, and not adjacent to any of the previous counties reporting outbreaks.

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What follows are excerpts from the two APHIS press releases, after which I’ll be back with a bit more.

 

USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in Beadle County, South Dakota Commercial Turkey Flock

Last Modified: Apr 2, 2015

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CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low

WASHINGTON, April 2, 2015 -- The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic H5N2 avian influenza (HPAI) in a commercial turkey flock in Beadle County, South Dakota.  The flock of 53,000 turkeys is located within the Central flyway, where this strain of avian influenza has previously been identified and is highly similar to the other H5 HPAI viruses detected this year. CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low.  No human infections with the virus have been detected at this time.

Samples from the turkey flock, which experienced increased mortality, were tested at the South Dakota State University Animal Disease Research & Diagnostic Laboratory.  The APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa confirmed the findings. APHIS is working closely with the South Dakota Animal Industry Board on a joint incident response. State officials quarantined the affected premises and birds on the property will be depopulated to prevent the spread of the disease. Birds from the flock will not enter the food system.

(Continue . . . )

 

 

USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in Nobles County, Minnesota Commercial Turkey Flock

Last Modified: Apr 2, 2015

CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low

WASHINGTON, April 2, 2015 -- The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic H5N2 avian influenza (HPAI) in a commercial turkey flock in Nobles County, Minnesota.  This is the fourth confirmation in a commercial flock in Minnesota.  The flock of 21,000 turkeys is located within the Mississippi flyway where this strain of avian influenza has previously been identified. CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low.  No human infections with the virus have been detected at this time.

Samples from the turkey flock, which experienced increased mortality, were tested at the University of Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory and the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa confirmed the findings. APHIS is working closely with the Minnesota Board of Animal Health on a joint incident response. State officials quarantined the affected premises and birds on the property will be depopulated to prevent the spread of the disease. Birds from the flock will not enter the food system.

(Continue . . . )

 

While primarily a concern for the poultry industry, a week ago, in  CDC: HPAI H5 Viruses In The United States,  we looked at the CDC’s advice regarding these avian viruses.

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For reasons that are not yet clear, this year we’ve seen the greatest geographic expansion of highly pathogenic avian flu viruses in almost a decade, with countries from Africa, to Europe, to Asia, and North America seeing either the return of H5N1, or the introduction of one (or more) of several new HPAI reassortant viruses. .

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Major Global Migratory Flyways – Credit FAO

 

For now – in North America, anyway – the biggest concerns lie with poultry producers.  Unlike in Europe, Asia, and the Middle East - the clades spreading in the United States have not been shown to be pathogenic in humans. 

 

But as the recent emergence of H5N8, H5N2, and H5N6 have proven – influenza viruses are always changing -  and what we can say about their behavior today cannot be guaranteed for the future.

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