Friday, January 15, 2016

CDC Issues Interim Travel Advice On Zika Virus (Level 2 - Enhanced Precautions)
















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After a three hour delay, the CDC released their interim travel recommendations of Zika at 7pm EST this evening, recommending - out of an abundance of caution - that Pregnant women in any trimester should consider postponing travel to the areas where Zika virus transmission is ongoing.
 
While a direct link between Zika virus infection and birth defects has not been conclusively established, the circumstantial evidence is sufficient for the CDC to make the recommendation. 

The primary concern is Brazil right now, but this travel advisory extends to all countries in the Americas seeing local transmission of the virus.  As of today that includes Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Martinique, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Suriname, Venezuela, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

The full press release may be accessed at the link below.


CDC issues interim travel guidance related to Zika virus for 14 Countries and Territories in Central and South America and the Caribbean

Out of an abundance of caution, pregnant women advised to consider postponing travel to areas where Zika virus transmission is ongoing 

Media Statement

For Immediate Release: Friday, January 15, 2016 Contact: Media Relations,
(404) 639-3286


CDC has issued a travel alert (Level 2-Practice Enhanced Precautions) for people traveling to regions and certain countries where Zika virus transmission is ongoing: Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Martinique, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Suriname, Venezuela, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

This alert follows reports in Brazil of microcephaly and other poor pregnancy outcomes in babies of mothers who were infected with Zika virus while pregnant. However, additional studies are needed to further characterize this relationship. More studies are planned to learn more about the risks of Zika virus infection during pregnancy.

Until more is known, and out of an abundance of caution, CDC recommends special precautions for pregnant women and women trying to become pregnant:
  • Pregnant women in any trimester should consider postponing travel to the areas where Zika virus transmission is ongoing. Pregnant women who must travel to one of these areas should talk to their doctor or other healthcare provider first and strictly follow steps to avoid mosquito bites during the trip.
  • Women trying to become pregnant who are thinking about becoming pregnant should consult with their healthcare provider before traveling to these areas and strictly follow steps to prevent mosquito bites during the trip
Because specific areas where Zika virus transmission is ongoing are difficult to determine and likely to change over time, CDC will update this travel notice as information becomes available. Check the CDC travel website frequently for the most up-to-date recommendations.
Currently, there is no vaccine to prevent or medicine to treat Zika. Four in five people who acquire Zika infection may have no symptoms. Illness from Zika is usually mild and does not require hospitalization. Travelers are strongly urged to protect themselves by preventing mosquito bites:
  • Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants
  • Use EPA-registered insect repellents containing DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE), or IR3535. Always use as directed.
    • Insect repellents containing DEET, picaridin, and IR3535 are safe for pregnant and nursing women and children older than 2 months when used according to the product label. Oil of lemon eucalyptus products should not be used on children under 3 years of age.
  • Use permethrin-treated clothing and gear (such as boots, pants, socks, and tents).
  • Stay and sleep in screened-in or air-conditioned rooms.
In addition to the steps announced today, CDC is working with public health experts across the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to take additional steps related to Zika. CDC is developing interim guidance for pregnant women as well as sharing additional information about Zika with public health officials, clinicians and the public.  In addition, efforts are underway across HHS to develop vaccines, improved diagnostics and other countermeasures for Zika. 

(Continue . . .)

Some recent blogs on the Zika/Microcephaly situation include:

Despite What You May Have Heard About The 1st Zika Case In The US . . . 

Brazil MOH: Updated Microcephalic Birth Numbers - Epi Week 1

CDC Statement: First Zika VIrus Infection Reported In Puerto Rico

 

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