Monday, April 06, 2015

APHIS: 2 More Minnesota Turkey Farms Hit By H5N2

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The USDA’s APHIS has announced that two more Minnesota farms have been hit by the Highly Pathogenic H5N2 virus, bringing to 7 the number commercial flocks hit so far in that state.  Stearns county, with three farms now reporting the virus, has been the hardest hit.

 

For now – in North America, anyway – the biggest concerns lie with poultry producers. 

 

While related to the H5N1 virus – which has killed several hundred people around the globe – these particular H5 viruses (H5N2 & H5N8) have not demonstrated a similar ability to infect and sicken humans. The CDC is taking a cautious approach to all of of these recently arrived HPAI viruses, however,  and has issued guidance for the testing, and prophylactic treatment of those exposed. 

 

 

USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in 3rd Stearns County, Minnesota Commercial Turkey Flock

Last Modified: Apr 6, 2015

 

CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low

WASHINGTON, April 06, 2015 -- The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic H5N2 avian influenza (HPAI) in a third commercial turkey flock in Stearns County, Minnesota.  This is the sixth confirmation in a commercial flock in Minnesota.  The flock of 76,000 turkeys is located within the Mississippi flyway where this strain of avian influenza has previously been identified. CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low.  No human infections with the virus have been detected at this time.

This flock is in the control area for a previous detection.   As part of our response protocol, samples were tested by the University of Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory as part of our standard surveillance work. The APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa confirmed the findings. APHIS is working closely with the Minnesota Board of Animal Health on a joint incident response. State officials quarantined the premises and birds on the property will be depopulated to prevent the spread of the disease. Birds from the flock will not enter the food system.

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USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in Kandiyohi County, Minnesota Commercial Turkey Flock

Last Modified: Apr 6, 2015

 

CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low

WASHINGTON, April 06, 2015 -- The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic H5N2 avian influenza (HPAI) in a molting breeder replacement turkey flock in Kandiyohi County, Minnesota.  This is the seventh confirmation in a commercial flock in Minnesota.  The flock of 26,000 turkeys is located within the Mississippi flyway where this strain of avian influenza has previously been identified. CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low.  No human infections with the virus have been detected at this time.

Samples from the turkey flock, which experienced increased mortality, were tested at the University of Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory and the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa confirmed the findings. APHIS is working closely with the Minnesota Board of Animal Health on a joint incident response. State officials quarantined the affected premises and birds on the property will be depopulated to prevent the spread of the disease. Birds from the flock will not enter the food system.

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Although migratory birds are viewed as the primary suspects in the spread of these avian viruses, exactly how they are managing to infect commercial flocks in California, Minnesota, Missouri, and Arkansas hasn’t been determined.  

 

This update today from the USDA.

 

Update on Avian Influenza Findings

Last Modified: Apr 6, 2015

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Since December 2014, the United States Department of Agriculture has confirmed several cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5 in the Pacific, Central, and Mississippi flyways (or migratory bird paths). The disease has been found in wild birds, as well as in a few backyard and commercial poultry flocks. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections to be low. No human cases of these HPAI H5 viruses have been detected in the United States, Canada, or internationally.

Poultry Findings Confirmed by USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories Include:

Captive Wild Bird Findings Confirmed by USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories:

Wild Bird Findings confirmed by USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories are available here.

Surveillance for avian influenza is ongoing in commercial poultry operations, live bird markets, and in migratory wild bird populations.

USDA is coordinating closely with its partners, including Arkansas, California, Idaho, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nevada, Oregon, Utah and Washington State officials, the U.S. Department of the Interior and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, on avian influenza surveillance, reporting, and control efforts.  The United States has the strongest AI surveillance program in the world, where we actively look for the disease and provide 100% compensation to affected producers to encourage reporting.

USDA continues to inform OIE and international trading partners of these findings.  USDA is working with trading partners to minimize trade impacts on poultry and poultry products as much as possible.

All bird owners, whether commercial producers or backyard enthusiasts, need to continue practicing good biosecurity, preventing contact between their birds and wild birds, and reporting sick birds or unusual bird deaths to State/Federal officials, either through your state veterinarian or through USDA’s toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593.  Additional information on biosecurity for backyard flocks can be found at healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov

USDA emphasizes that poultry, poultry products and wild birds (see biosecurity and wild birds) are safe to eat if they are properly handled and cooked to a temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit.

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