Sunday, November 04, 2012

NWS: Possible Coastal Storm Mid-Week

 

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Source CDC

 

 


# 6694

 

As I mentioned on Thursday (see A Worrisome Mid-Week Forecast), computer models are increasingly indicating a coastal storm/Nor’easter for the Mid-Atlantic & New England states later this week.

 

Not only will this increase the misery factor for residents and rescue workers dealing with the aftermath of Sandy, for those without power or heat temperatures and wind chills may drop dangerously low.

 

This is the latest Hazardous Weather Outlook from the New York NWS, issued early this morning:

HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK


NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NEW YORK NY
339 AM EST SUN NOV 4 2012

THIS HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK IS FOR SOUTHERN CONNECTICUT...NORTHEAST NEW JERSEY AND SOUTHEAST NEW YORK.

.DAY ONE...TODAY AND TONIGHT.

TEMPERATURES TONIGHT ARE EXPECTED TO FALL INTO THE 20S AND 30S.


THOSE WITHOUT POWER SHOULD PLAN FOR ANOTHER COLD NIGHT.

.DAYS TWO THROUGH SEVEN...MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY.

LOW TEMPERATURES MONDAY NIGHT ARE EXPECTED TO FALL INTO THE 20S.


THOSE WITHOUT POWER SHOULD BE PREPARED FOR ANOTHER COLD NIGHT.

THERE IS THE POTENTIAL FOR A COASTAL STORM TO IMPACT THE TRI-STATE REGION WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY.

THIS STORM HAS THE POTENTIAL TO BRING STRONG GUSTY WINDS...RAIN/WINTRY PRECIPITATION...COASTAL FLOODING AND ADDITIONAL BEACH EROSION TO THE TRI-STATE AREA.


STAY TUNED FOR THE LATEST FORECASTS.

 

 

The 7 day forecast for Newark, NJ gives a pretty good idea of the expected progression of the weather.

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The concern here isn’t just for the cold, for every year we get tragic reports of people who either started a house fire, or succumbed to Carbon Monoxide poisoning, while trying to heat their homes during a power outage.

 

The sources of CO are numerous; faulty furnaces, snow blocked car exhaust pipes, attempts to use generators inside the house or garage . . . and the use of CO producing emergency heat sources all contribute to the winter body count.

 

The CDC’s MMWR released a report in 2005 called Unintentional Non--Fire-Related Carbon Monoxide Exposures --- United States, 2001—2003 that stated:

 

During 2001--2003, an estimated 15,200 persons with confirmed or possible non--fire-related CO exposure were treated annually in hospital EDs. In addition, during 2001--2002, an average of 480 persons died annually from non--fire-related CO poisoning. Although males and females were equally likely to visit an ED for CO exposure, males were 2.3 times more likely to die from CO poisoning. Most (64%) of the nonfatal CO exposures occurred in homes. Efforts are needed to educate the public about preventing CO exposure.

 

The CDC maintains a webpage on Carbon Monoxide, which you can access here, and has this short video on what they call the `quiet killer’.

 

 

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